Official Movie Website

Theatrical Release
10/22/2010 (St. Louis)

Home Video
Not Available

MPAA Rating
Rated R for strong sexuality
and violence, and pervasive
language

Running Time
105 Minutes

Genre
Suspense, Drama

Director
John Curran

Writer
Angus MacLachlan

Cast
Robert De Niro, Edward
Norton, Milla Jovovich,
Frances Conroy

Studio
Overture Films
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STONE      (2010)  
                                     SYNOPSIS

Academy Award® winner Robert De Niro and Oscar®
nominee Edward Norton deliver powerful
performances as a seasoned corrections official and a
scheming inmate whose lives become dangerously
intertwined in Stone, a thought-provoking drama
directed by John Curran (The Painted Veil, We Don’t
Live Here Anymore) and written by Angus McLachlan
(Junebug). As parole officer Jack Mabry (De Niro)
counts the days toward a quiet retirement, he is asked
to review the case of Gerald “Stone” Creeson (Norton),
in prison for covering up the murder of his
grandparents with a fire. Now eligible for early release,
Stone needs to convince Jack he has reformed, but his
attempts to influence the older man’s decision have
profound and unexpected effects on them both. Stone
skillfully weaves together the parallel journeys of two
men grappling with dark impulses, as the line between
lawman and lawbreaker becomes precariously thin.
The film’s superb ensemble features Milla Jovovich
(The Fifth Element) as Lucetta, Stone’s sexy, casually
amoral wife, and Golden Globe® winner Frances
Conroy (Six Feet Under) as Madylyn, Jack’s devout,
long-suffering spouse. Set against the quiet
desperation of economically ravaged suburban Detroit
and the stifling brutality of a maximum security prison,
this tale of passion, betrayal and corruption examines
the fractured lives of two volatile men breaking from
their troubled pasts to face uncertain futures.
--© Overture Films
© 2003 St. Louis Movie Review Weekly. All rights reserved, except where indicated.
All movie titles, pictures, etc...are the property of their respective studios.  
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Academy Award Nominated Edward Norton (The Painted Veil) and Director John Curran (The Painted Veil)
team up once again for
Stone, a suspense drama about four individuals whose interaction derails their
paths.  Jack Mabry (Robert De Niro;
Cape Fear, The Score) is a parole officer about to retire after 40
years.  At the beginning of the film the audience gets a glimpse of Mabry’s true character when he
threatens to throw his young sleeping daughter out the window if his wife Madelyn (Francis Conroy;
The
Aviator, The Crucible
) leaves him.  Mabry decides to finish out one last case before he leaves and the case
he gets is Gerald “Stone” Cleeson (Edward Norton;
American History X, The Score) , an arsonist finishing
up 8 years of his 10-15 year sentence.  Stone is determined to do whatever it takes to get out of prison
even if that means using his beautiful wife, Lucetta Cleeson (Milla Jovovich;
Resident Evil, A Perfect
Getaway
) to do his ‘dirty’ work.  Realizing he has to prove to a board he is a changed man he begins
reading different spiritual books.  The different religious views of the four characters begins to tangle
them further and the buried secrets they all harbor intertwine them into a lethal game of deception. The
performances by the four actors are phenomenal and definitely Oscar-worthy.  The way Norton is able to
transform himself into the intricate character “Stone” is astounding and definitely makes the movie worth
seeing.  Unfortunately, the film itself is a little dull and lifeless.  Curran tries to tie in too much religious
symbolism (anytime someone gets into a car it is tuned into a Christian talk radio station); and therefore,
the message about spiritual ambiguity and corruption loses its punch.  The screenplay for the most part is
pretty realistic, but the ambiguous ending leaves audiences desiring something a little more dramatic.  
By David Ladd